The Lovely Quotes

I want to
live in a library
and this is the closest I can get.

Featured so far:

Hemingway
Benedict Groeschel
St. Augustine
Janet Soskice

To come:

Thoreau
Steinbeck

When you are 13 years old,
the heat will be turned up too high
and the stars will not be in your favor.
You will hide behind a bookcase
with your family and everything left behind.
You will pour an ocean into a diary.
When they find you, you will be nothing
but a spark above a burning bush,
still, tell them
Despite everything, I really believe people are good at heart.

When you are 14,
a voice will call you to greatness.
When the doubters call you crazy, do not listen.
They don’t know the sound
of their own God’s whisper. Use your armor,
use your sword, use your two good hands.
Do not let their doubting
drown out the sound of your own heartbeat.
You are the Maid of Untamed Patriotism.
Born to lead armies into victory and unite a nation
like a broken heart.

When you are 15, you will be punished
for learning too proudly. A man
will climb onto your school bus and insist
your sisters name you enemy.
When you do not hide,
he will point his gun at your temple
and fire three times. Three years later,
in an ocean of words, with no apologies,
you will stand before the leaders of the world
and tell them your country is burning.

When you are 16 years old,
you will invent science fiction.
The story of a man named Frankenstein
and his creation. Soon after you will learn
that little girls with big ideas are more terrifying
than monsters, but don’t worry.
You will be remembered long after
they have put down their torches.

When you are 17 years old,
you will strike out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig
one right after the other.
Men will be afraid of the lightening
in your fingertips. A few days later
you will be fired from the major leagues
because “Girls are too delicate to play baseball”

You will turn 18 with a baby on your back
leading Lewis and Clark
across North America.

You will turn 18 
and become queen of the Nile.

You will turn 18 
and bring justice to journalism.

You are now 18, standing on the precipice,
trembling before your own greatness.

This is your call to leap.

There will always being those
who say you are too young and delicate
to make anything happen for yourself.
They don’t see the part of you that smolders.
Don’t let their doubting drown out the sound
of your own heartbeat.

You are the first drop of a hurricane.
Your bravery builds beyond you. You are needed
by all the little girls still living in secret,
writing oceans made of monsters and
throwing like lightening.

You don’t need to grow up to find greatness.
You are stronger than the world has ever believed you to be.
The world laid out before you to set on fire.
All you have to do
is burn.

“That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you’re not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.”

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby  | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

(via nayyirahwaheed)

Hey! You should know about Planetisimals

…because they are tiny planets


youngadultatbooktopia:

If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.
– Haruki Murakami

(via bookphile)

“The true poet has no choice of material. The material plainly chooses him, not he it.”

—   J.D. Salinger  (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: nickiland, via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

“I don’t make up marvelous tales. I only try to express — as clearly as possible — the thoughts and feelings many people have. Often my subjects are the simplest things in the world: joy, family, the weather, houses, streets. Nothing fancy. And when I sit down with these subjects my aim is clarity. I’m really trying to clear some of the muddle from my own brain — my brain being a very muddled place indeed. Sometimes I think my whole professional life has been based on this hunch I had, early on, that many people feel just as muddled as I do, and might be happy to tag along with me on this search for clarity, for precision. I love that aspect of writing. Nothing makes me happier than to hear a reader say: that’s just what I’ve always felt, but you said it clearly.”

—   Zadie Smith, in her acceptance remarks for the 2014 Moth Award (via booksmatter)

(via booksmatter)

Blessed be the Lord, my rock,
who trains my hands for war,
and my fingers for battle;
my rock and my fortress,
my stronghold and my deliverer,
my shield, in whom I take refuge

thedustdancestoo:

and this is why the sky never ends,
and valentine’s flowers last only a week
before rotting and

why we step in puddles
with new shoes on and why
the only memories we can remember 

are the ones that make us sick
inside, and why so many people fuck,
but never love, and this is why

late at night, beneath the covers
as the light bulbs cool off, i feel nothing
in my soul except the ceiling fan. 

- thedustdancestoo

(Source: thedustdancestoo, via thedustdancestoo)